New Domain this week: .Poker

Afilias launches .poker this week, and it is the only new TLD launch I could find.

DotPokerI can only find one new top level domain name on Calzone.org that’s launching this week, so it will get a little extra focus.

Afilias launches .Poker on Tuesday with support from about 70 registrars. Retail pricing appears to be in the $40-$50 range.

Heading into today, there are about 540 domain names in the .Poker zone file, so it’s off to a fairly good start through sunrise and landrush. Some of the good domain names that are already taken include: 7CardStud.poker, Bluff.poker, Live.poker and Watch.poker.

Many of the registrations so far are brands, some related to poker and others not. Gambling company domains registered so far include: PokerStars.poker, FullTilt.poker, Bodog.poker and Bellagio.poker.

Other brands protecting themselves include the usual suspects: Apple.poker, TDameritrade.poker and XBox.poker.

Afilias beat Donuts, Famous Four Media and Dot Poker LLC to win rights to the .Poker domain name.

Is Amazon.com the biggest user of new domain names?

Amazon has registered a bunch of domains under new TLDs, and it’s forwarding them to pages on its website.

Amazon.comIt’s still unclear what Amazon.com’s strategy is for the many top level domain names it will soon control. But we might get a hint from examining its use of other registry’s top level domain names.

Amazon.com has been a big buyer of second level domain names in new TLDs. For example, it picked up many city names under .delivery.

I’ve also noticed recently that it registered a bunch of generic or descriptive terms under new TLDs last year that were originally registered under Mark Monitor’s DNStinations. The whois records are slowly shifting to Amazon.com, unveiling more and more domains. Click here to continue reading…

Google nixing domain names in mobile search

Search results replace domain name with site name.

Google is making sweeping changes to its search rankings on mobile devices next week, but the search giant just introduced another pretty big change.

Starting yesterday, Google began replacing the URL in search results with the site’s name and breadcrumb. The site-name-instead-of-domain is rolling out in the U.S. only for now. Breadcrumbs are rolling out worldwide.

Here’s an example: Click here to continue reading…

Donuts’ new TLD renewal rates range from 55% to 72%

Company releases updated figures for renewal rates.

New top level domain name company Donuts has released updated renewal rates for the first 25 top level domain names it launched. Rates range from about 55% to 72%, well under the company’s predicted 80% renewal rate. (The company now says it expects rates to trend toward 80% later in the year.)

The highest renewal rate belongs to .technology at 71.7%. The lowest is .directory at just 54.7%.

.Guru, which received more first year registrations than any other Donuts domain, has a renewal rate of 57.5%. The company believes there were “a disproportionate number of speculative buyers” in .guru. Click here to continue reading…

Sneeze.com: great brand with an interesting history

A chain of allergy doctors uses a fantastic domain name.

Sneeze.com

Great brand for an allergist.

The other day I got out of my car at a retail center and noticed this great domain name on the building next to me: Sneeze.com.

This is a fantastic name for an allergy doctor!

I looked up the company and found that they have multiple allergy centers in Central Texas as well as one in the Los Angeles area.

The domain name has a bit of history, too. Remember Gazoontite.com, the .com company that filed for bankruptcy when the bubble burst? I recall ready that the company bought a bunch of variations of its domain name because it’s hard to spell. Apparently it also owned Sneeze.com, which is frankly a much better name than Gazoontite.com.

I personally see an allergist in Austin. While researching allergists many years ago, I found that they all had similar names…Austin Allergy this, Austin Allergy that… Sneeze.com is a great differentiator.