GoDaddy releases earnings, picks GDDY ticker

Domain name registrar gets one step closer to IPO.

GoDaddyGoDaddy filed an amended S-1 statement with the SEC today that revealed fourth quarter and full year 2014 financials, as well as the company’s planned NYSE stock ticker GDDY.

Fourth quarter revenue at the company grew to $371.7 million, up from $356.9 million in the third quarter and $305.9 million in the same quarter of 2013. The company reported a net loss of ($26.8) million for the quarter, about in line with the third quarter.

For the year, total revenue increased $256.4 million, or 22.7%, to $1.4 billion. The company reported a loss of ($143.3) million for the year. (The company reports an adjusted EBITDA number that is positive.)

Total customers increased 1.1 million on the year to hit 12.7 million.

While the domain name business continues to grow, it makes up a smaller percentage of the company’s business each quarter as the hosting and business application segments grow at a faster clip.

I ran the amended S-1 through Intelligize’s comparison tool. Most of the changes were related to security and compensation.

So I got a call from Register.com this week…

Registrar called about a renewal, and it was strange.

If you have any domain names at a Web.com registrar (Register.com and Network Solutions), you know the company is big on marketing to its customer base. You literally get one email every day from the company, promoting everything from search engine optimization to Facebook pages. Most of them end up in your spam folder.

This week I got a call from Register.com that was helpful in one way, but disconcerting in another.

I won a domain name in a drop that’s now at Register.com and it’s coming up for renewal. The company called to ask if I wanted to renew it.

This is actually quite helpful. As it turns out, I’m having a problem with an old email address tied to the account, and I wasn’t aware that I hadn’t transferred the domain to another registrar yet. Many domain names expire because of email problems, and a call from the registrar would prevent many of these domains from expiring. Click to continue reading…

How to Get the Lowest Prices at GoDaddy

GoDaddy has a bunch of pricing tiers and discounts. The best deal depends a lot on the size of your domain name portfolio.

DiscountIf you’re a domainer, you shouldn’t be paying list price for domain name registrations at GoDaddy (or any registrar, for that matter).

Since a lot of readers use GoDaddy, I thought it worthwhile to run down the various discount options at the registrar.

Price is one of the most important considerations when choosing a domain name registrar, according to last year’s Domain Name Wire survey. (Pssst…take this year’s here.) GoDaddy doesn’t always win on pricing, but below are some of the ways to make sure you’re not overpaying. Click here to continue reading…

.Online partnership splits, one company will operate new TLD

Companies end .online partnership, but all three will help market the domain name.

A three company partnership for the .online top level domain name has broken up, and it appears Radix will now run the domain name by itself.

A partnership between Radix, Tucows and NameCheap won the contention set auction for .online last year, reportedly paying more than $10 million for the domain name. All three parties then made capital contributions to the partnership to cover the cost of the auction and running the business.

On Tucows’ 4th quarter conference call this afternoon, CEO Elliot Noss reported that the companies decided to end the partnership based on diverging businesses. Two of the partners will receive their capital contributions back and have entered into marketing arrangements when the new TLD becomes available. Click here to continue reading…

GoDaddy amends IPO filing

GoDaddy updates S-1, but it doesn’t include final 2014 financials.

GoDaddy filed an amended S-1 statement with the Securities & Exchange Commission today.

I’ll save you a couple hours of combing over the new document for changes…there aren’t many, unless you’re fascinated by GoDaddy’s corporate and shareholder structure and its investors’ plans to minimize taxes.

Using Intelligize’s Smart Compare feature, I compared the current S-1 to the previous one filed November 17. Essentially, the majority of changes are related to tax distributions and Tax Receivable Agreements (TRAs).

The filing doesn’t include full year results for 2014, which I expect to be filed within the next few weeks. I’ll write about the updated results when they become available.

GoDaddy is expected to go public in the first half of this year.