Domain Name Wire

Domain Name Wire

Displaying archives for the month of "January 2015"

  • Was Michele.watch registered for Porn or for Watches?

    1. BY - Jan 28, 2015
    2. Policy & Law
    3. 2 Comments

    Domain name registrant came up with a creative defense in UDRP.

    Michele WatchA National Arbitration Forum panel has ordered the domain name Michele.watch transferred to watchmaker Fossil Group, Inc.

    I’ve got to hand it to the respondent in this case. He put up a spirited defense of his registration of Michele.watch.

    Enadin Kucevic said he didn’t register the domain name to take advantage of Fossil’s Michele brand of watches. Instead, he registered it for use as a porn site. The idea was that visitors could “watch michele” do pole dances and such.

    He actually had me siding with him in his defense…at first. The problem is that Kucevic registered a number of other brands in .watch that would be harder to defend: bering.watch, breda.watch, breil.watch, croton.watch, stuhrling.watch, swisslegend.watch, and timeforce.watch. Oh, and he also listed Michele.watch and other domains for sale on Sedo.

    The rationale panelist Maninder Singh used to decide the case is rather weak and boilerplate. But the registration of other watch brands pretty much doomed the domain name owner’s argument that Michele.watch was created for a porn site, not because of the watch brand.

  • GoDaddy to change controversial Super Bowl Commercial

    1. BY - Jan 27, 2015
    2. Domain Registrars
    3. 18 Comments

    GoDaddy won’t run controversial “Journey Home” commercial.

    GoDaddy’s 2015 Super Bowl commercial, which it just released this morning, won’t air on Sunday after all.

    GoDaddy CEO Blake Irving tweeted this afternoon:

    godaddy-sb

    The ad was criticized by many animal lovers.

    In many ways, the commercial was classic GoDaddy. It was sure to spark outrage, which got people talking about the company…much like its previous GoDaddy commercials.

    I wondered this morning if the plan was to get this commercial out there and then pull it in favor of another. They’d get extra publicity by making the change.

    But I’m not so sure about that. Puppygate is more like Elephantgate than GoDaddys typical Super Bowl ads of past. There was little upside to GoDaddy founder Bob Parsons shooting an elephant. There’s probably little upside to joking about selling puppies, too.

    I also don’t think it’s Blake Irving’s style.

  • GoDaddy’s Super Bowl Commercial will be its most controversial yet [Watch]

    1. BY - Jan 27, 2015
    2. Domain Registrars
    3. 28 Comments

    Here’s proof you can have controversy without nudity.

    [Update: GoDaddy won’t run this ad after all.]

    GoDaddy made a name for itself with controversial Super Bowl commercials.

    If you thought its move from sexy commercials to one featuring a puppy dog meant the company was shying away from controversy, you’re in for a bit of a surprise.

    This year’s commercial (embedded below) features an adorable puppy dog that gets tossed off a truck, yet perseveres and finds its way home. Yet “Buddy” is in for a rude surprise when he finds his way back to his owner.

    Critics this year won’t be upset about half-nude models. Instead, the commercial will conjure up hate from pet lovers and organizations around the world.

    Hey, at least it wasn’t an elephant.

    What do you think?

  • This week’s new TLDs: .Space, Google’s .How and .RIP

    1. BY - Jan 27, 2015
    2. Uncategorized
    3. 0 Comments

    6 new top level domain names will be released on Wednesday.

    A number of new top level domain names are being launched in general availability this week, all on Wednesday.

    Radix’s .Space hits registrars’ shelves at a price of about $10. It’s a generic domain, but also conjures up the idea of your “space” online. Their site markets it as “A .space domain is for passionate and driven individuals and groups who want to carve out a personalized space online. It specially caters to freelancers, professionals, hobbyists and small business owners who want to showcase the panorama of their skills and commitment to their passion.”

    BusinessRalliart releases the geo domain name .ryukyu, which is related to Okinawa. Expect to pay about $15 for domains in this extension.

    Rightside releases two domain names: .band and .rip. I’m more bullish on .band, but I’m also interested in seeing the types of domains that are registered in .rip. Will they end up being mostly celebrity tribute sites? .Band domain names will cost you about $25-$30 retail, while .Rip domains are about $5 cheaper.

    Here’s an interesting Chinese IDN: Chinese for “I Love You”, .我爱你.

    Finally, Google launches the .how domain name this week. It will set you back about $30-$35 at many registrars. I don’t know how this domain will become popular, but you never know…

  • Photo.com — sold for over $1 million twice — saved in UDRP

    1. BY - Jan 26, 2015
    2. Policy & Law
    3. 1 Comment

    Complainant makes interesting allegations in UDRP.

    A three person WIPO panel has handed down a decision in a UDRP for Photo.com in a case I wrote about in October.

    The complainant owns Foto.com, but there’s a lot more to the story than just a company using UDRP to go after a great domain name.

    According to complainant Fotocom Société Anonyme:

    Complainant contends that Respondent is actually controlled or influenced by its former Chief Executive Officer (hereinafter “Panos”). According to the Complaint, Panos was Complainant’s CEO from 2005 until 2011, and it is alleged that in 2010 Panos launched a “competing activity” under the name “Photo.com.” It is further alleged that in 2010, Panos, in his position as CEO, hired a United Kingdom law firm to pursue the acquisition the Domain Name photo.com from a domain broker. Complainant alleges that Panos was actually secretly bidding against his own company and that, in February 2010, the Domain Name was sold for USD 1,250,000 to a company, xxlpix Limited, controlled by Panos. Complainant even alleges that the purchase price for the Domain Name Panos surreptitiously acquired was actually financed by Complainant’s money, through the “illegal diversion” of company funds “through illegal offshore mechanisms.”

    If that was the case, the current domain name owner says it had nothing to do with that past purchase.

    Photography company motiondrive AG says it acquired the domain name via domain broker DomainHoldings for over 1 million euros in 2012.

    It appears that Photo.com has sold for over a million dollars twice in the past five years.

    motiondrive AG claims Fotocom is engaged in “a delusional crusade”; Fotocom still believes Panos is the owner of the domain name.

    The panel denied the complaint. Even if Fotocom’s allegations are true, they aren’t the type of issue a UDRP panel addresses.