Domain Name Wire

Domain Name Wire

  • New TLD registries need to forget about sunrise revenue

    1. BY - Mar 04, 2014
    2. Policy & Law
    3. 28 Comments

    New top level domain registries need to scratch the sunrise line item off their P&Ls.

    I think many observers are surprised by the low number of trademark sunrise registrations in new top level domain names so far.

    Calzone, a calendar for new TLD rollouts, has put together some numbers and analysis on sunrise periods so far.

    The net-net is that sunrises so far have averaged between 100-200 registrations. That’s about 1% of how many sunrise registrations .co received in 2010. Even .Co received fewer sunrise registrations than previous launches such as .asia, .mobi, .eu, etc.

    There are a number of reasons other registries might be able to get more sunrise registrations than Donuts, which has launched the bulk of domains so far.

    1. Donuts offers a system-wide trademark block. I suspect about 500-1,500 of these blocks have been placed. While the block customers might not register their domains in every TLD, certainly not having a block option would have led to more one-off sunrise registrations.

    2. It’s still early and trademark holders are belatedly learning about new TLDs and brand protection mechanisms. Some are registering domains in general availability that could be registered in sunrise periods going forward.

    3. More general TLDs might get more sunrise registrations. Niche domains will attract industry participants, e.g. clothing brands for .clothing. Generic domains like .xyz and .site might attract a broader range of sunrise registrants. Conversely, it’s possible that niche domains will end up getting more sunrise registrations because brand holders in the specific industries will be more aware.

    4. Some of the more controversial TLDs are likely to get more sunrise registrations. Remember that .xxx received 80,000 blocking registrations.

    Still, it’s clear that sunrise won’t be a big revenue driver for most TLDs. I think many brands have figured out they need to change their approach to cybersquatting. They also realize cybersquatting won’t be that big of a deal in new TLDs.

    I know that many registries were counting on sunrise numbers similar to previously launched domain names. Comparing anything from previous rounds of TLD expansion to this one is clearly a mistake.

28 Comments
  • With so many extensions most companies simply will bring the matter to a legal front, when it becomes an issue at hand. I do not blame companies to keep paying registries extortion money to have their marks blocked. After a while the companies will not pay protection money anymore, really a never ending racket. Tony Soprano had nothing on this domain family.

    I think most domainers have more domains than some of these extensions have total.

  • Another reason could be URS. .xxx and .co don’t have URS, while all new gTLDs do.

  • Ryan – I saw the same comment left by Leonard B. at DG today. Are you using multiple aliases or sharing his comment?

    Either way, the statement is silly. Domainers don’t account for the majority of gTLD registrations, as much as those uninterested in the new gTLDs would like it to be.

    Regarding the trademark revenue from sunrise registrations, it’s all about a company’s will to spend any kind of money on defensive registrations that make no sense. Nobody cares about apple.plumbing, seriously. On the other hand, some of the TMCH entries are ridiculous: a tm on foodstuff could block photography registrations? Good luck with that.

    Overall, this is a new era, with lots of unanswered questions. Tread carefully, learning along the way.

    • @Acro

      Since I ignore your blogs, I will ignore your one sided comments.

      • Don’t be so defensive, I simply made a reference to your use of someone else’s comment. But since Leonard Britt isn’t really afraid to use his name, I call your comment here a blatant attempt at copying off someone else’s arguments. By the way, it makes little difference to me or my traffic whether you ignore my blogs or not. I am very active publicly, both online and in person; unlike the usual trolls that hide behind keyboard bravado.

        Do you have anything of substance to say on the argument, or you are trolling blogs to spew ill-conceived arguments about how you dislike gTLDs?

        • @Acro

          Last time I respond to your child like behavior, I will make this quick, and brief, since you are ruining Andrews thread with your own agenda:

          If you look at the GTLD numbers some extensions have 5000 or less domains in their files. Many domainers own this many in their own accounts.

          • Ryan, I am responding to your ‘smart’ comment that was a copycat of someone else’s.

            The exact phrase by Leonard was “How many domainers have more registrations than some of the bottom TLDs”, made around midnight EST last night.

            Since your argument copied that comment almost verbatim, I assume that you’re actually a closet reader of DG. :) And that’s fine, because anonymity leads to bizarre behavior among those that preach one thing, and do another.

            To your borrowed argument: Domainers come in a variety of colors and shapes. Whether you have 1 domain or 10,000 is not a rule of comparison to establish the worth or the potential of gTLDs. Considering how the ‘game’ just got started, and has zero publicity as far as campaigns are concerned, I would be more careful making such assumptions 30 days since launch.

            Every gTLD is a separate market and is mostly targeting keyword+gTLD brands. That’s the biggest separation from the usual com/net/org etc. approach: keywords need to make sense, so don’t expect humanity.plumbing to be registered, although I’d love to own the .org.

            How about we revisit this in a year, or two, when cabin fever subsides?

          • It does seem like Acro spends the day scouring the blogs and forums looking to defend the new gtlds whenever possible and what I pointed out before “multiple aliases” the old routine of trying to take posts in another direction with trolling people about what name they post under. But despite all his attempts, you can’t escape the numbers. From the “low number of trademark sunrise registrations” to the overall low numbers that anybody can see. The 2 he keeps pushing on his blog, have a total of 4700, tattoo not even getting 1000 yet according to Registrar Stats. I’m sure the people selling these expected a lot more.

          • ChuckWagen says:

            March 4, 2014 at 10:25 pm

            Not normally one to defend Acro, but immediately when I saw Ryan’s first post I knew I’d seen it before, and way before today. It struck me as odd. Not sure why someone would get so defensive about being asked about it.

  • @Jonathan

    I actually feel sorry for the guy.

    • Ryan, I am right here bud. :D Don’t be such a wuss, address me in person. Or are you afraid of holding a conversation that unveils your argument’s flaws? And please respond to my question above, I can hold a conversation just fine.

      Jonathan – Nice try. I waited for you to comment on DNForum, but again, you’re a shadow player. That’s a euphemism for troll. Your investment in gTLDs is zero, hence your argument’s validity in anything related to its potential.

  • The argument that New gTLD people should be given a year or two to advertise is simply stupid.

    Any kid with great idea attains Viral status on Youtube, and it happens almost everyday!

    The constant blogging about the promise and virtues of the New TLDs, has become cacophonous, and in Acros case, rowdy. It is becoming difficult for the real issues involved to be isolated, and somewhat of an EL DORADO!

    • Domen – Welcome to the circus, we were in need of a clown. I find your choice of words entertaining. Cacophonous? My voice is just fine, fair and balanced. In fact, I accept counter-arguments that arrive with facts, versus a pseudo-intellectual epidermis. Oops, another Greek word for your future ramblings.

    • @Domenclature.com

      You are entitled to your opinions this is a free forum of ideas, do not let one sponsor seeker drown your statements. It is best to ignore the ones who seek the most attention, as they are not getting it elsewhere, and must seek it by attacking people who are trying to have a meaningful discussion on a thread.

      I saw this person set a record for dislikes on Elliot’s Blog, so just shows you how many people actually care of what he spews out. He is like this GTLD monkey that pops up anytime anything questions certain issues within the extensions.
      Someone is afraid to own up to the weak numbers, citing lack of advertising, hence 1&1 set advertising record that was drowned out, and every registar has front page exposure of gtld’s. None of us will make, or break these GTLD’s so you need to let people speak, and think for themselves.

      I truly do feel sorry for you, you should get out and interact a bit more, instead of spending your days defending the universe against so called first name trolls, who are trying to discuss matters in relation to domaining, which may not agree with your own investment strategy.

      • @Ryan,

        I appreciate that, thanks.

      • Ryan – You’re referring to the guy who used a VPN proxy to downvote me 30 times? :) I bet you’re so naive as to believe Elliot’s voting system is not rigged. Thanks for the laugh.

        And I was at NamesCon, interacting with 600 people, where were you, oh Ryan? Domenclature said he’d be there, but he had a change of heart dictated by BS reasons. Maybe you two need to go out and have a beer or something.

        Again, on the subject of gTLDs: those of you that don’t like them, please stay away, there’s no need to become enlightened competition.

        • Affluent Entrepreneur says:

          March 4, 2014 at 2:39 pm

          Der…duh….ahhh…..

          Dude, your gtld spam posts are dumber than a bowl-full of dog-squeeze

        • To come here, and disrespect, and insult one’s readership, and the outreach of their sponsors is truly an act of trollism, and utter disrespect towards this blog.

          • Ryan – I come here as an independent consultant and professional. If you don’t like me, or the tone/style of my comments, that’s your personal thesis on the matter. If we agree to disagree, so be it. I have valid things to say, and you seem to be focusing on me, not what I have to say. I hope you’re having a productive day otherwise.

          • I am standing up for your bully tactics against people with different opinions, unlike you I will stand up against cyber bully’s, whereas you seem to focus on EVERYONE in a negative light who does not share the same view as you.

            Everyone has a right to say what they need to say, either for or against, you should respect that.

        • “Domainers don’t account for the majority of gTLD registrations”

          Acro, I’ve seen you post that before but not with any real numbers backing that up, do you have any? It really doesn’t make much sense, since domainers are usually the first to know and register any new extension and usually in big numbers. I don’t think anybody that’s been in the business, would actually buy what you posted. So looking forward to the numbers.

          • The argument was first raised by whoever posted that ridiculous claim on DNForum. Was that you? Don’t be afraid, I don’t bite. I debunked that argument there; since you’re a DNForum regular, you’ve seen my response.

            Ryan – So you’re a desperado / vigilante / robin hood just because you don’t like my style. I get it. Sorry to disappoint your expectations of a less assertive person, but please mind your own business pal.

          • Acro, proving my point yet again. You made that statement HERE. We all know it’s ridiculous and in your reply you could have backed it up. You didn’t because you can’t. And as I said before, whenever anybody challenges you on something you can’t back up, you resort to name calling. Typical. You referred to yourself as a professional in the previous post, but have yet to display it. Again, lets look at some numbers to back your statement up, unless you want to run from the challenge yet again. Put it here, where the conversation is happening.

            And for any blogs, this might be a good topic, a poll or something. I can’t imagine any actual experienced domainers thinking the majority of registrations are held by endusers and not domainers.

          • Jonathan, this guy received 85 total dislikes for his comments on Elliot’s GTLD blog post the other day.

            Which should tell you people are not laughing with them, but essentially at him.

  • For someone to have so much disrespect, and come and insult another blog’s readership, and insult their sponsorship is really a low, and inhumane act of trollism. You remind me of that guy in the room who thinks everyone is laughing with him, but really they are laughing at you.

    Just because you choose to disagree, does not warrant the need for insults, and cyber bullying.

  • One ominous sign? None of the new gTLDs has trended on Twitter, NONE! All of them have not.

    The Kardashians have.

    Think about it for a second: Millions spent releasing hundreds of gTLDs, no trending on Twitter. inauspicious!

  • I hope Acro finally stops commenting on blogs around and finds something else to do. Reading him is not fun or has any value.

    We really can cope without you! Please stay on your blog.

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