DomainTools gives spotlight to screenshots with Screenshots.com

Company launches dedicated site for historical screenshots.

ScreenshotsWe all know that DomainTools is a domain name treasure trove. But few people know how extensive the data is. Sometimes the company highlights it with a dedicated site such as DailyChanges.com for nameserver changes.

Today it launched Screenshots.com, a standalone site to highlight its historical screenshots of millions of domain names.

Any domainer should give the company credit for the great domain name. It sold for $29,420 back in 2007 and DomainTools bought it for $32,500 this year.

Screenshots.com does what it says it does — provides access to screenshots of domain names. I think DomainTools’ historical screenshots are one of its best kept secrets. They shouldn’t be a secret — they’re on every whois record. But for some reason I still see people referring to the Wayback machine, which I find severely lacking. DomainTools captures the entire screenshot whereas Archive.org gets just the HTML. And Archive.org is slow, doesn’t show updates for recent months, and often returns errors.

Another bonus of DomainTools’ screenshots now having a dedicated domain? Quick URL access, such as screenshots.com/domainnamewire.com/.

I know I’ll be using this standalone tool a lot.

Comments

  1. Jeremy Leader says

    I think if you’re going to compare screenshots.com and archive.org, it’s worth pointing out that archive.org attempts to save the html of all the pages on a site, rather than an image of just the front page. Two very different tools, useful for very different purposes.

  2. S.W. says

    Agree.

    According to their FAQ, there’s little that can be done to request exclusion (via robots.txt or any other means) and removal of any non-illegal/non-defaming screenshots can apparently be done via court order only.

    At least archive.org allows removal with a single line in robots.txt, if only screenshots would consider that instead of requiring folks to incur additional legal expenses in order to opt-out.

  3. Meyer says

    I wonder if they receive a couple copyright infringement suits, will they become more website owner friendly. Especially since the ppc/trafficz cash cow is dead.

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